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The Lord's Supper as Speech Act: But Who's Doing the Talking? (Part 4)

To link the uniquely Mennonite soteriology as seen in Yoder and Weaver with an understanding of the Lord’s Supper that goes beyond mere memorial to include the action of God, we must look elsewhere. 905 more words

The Lord's Supper as Speech Act: But Who's Doing the Talking? (Part 3)

The Anabaptist-Mennonite tradition has primarily held a synergistic understanding of salvation. Salvation, redemption, eternal life are provided by the work of Christ alone, and then enacted in the human person and community by the will of God working along with the human will. 788 more words

“As servant people we are relaxed. The weight of the world has been lifted from our shoulders; we are not the managers of society—nor would we be if we thought we were.

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THE ANATOMYOF PERVERSION: A PSYCHOTHEOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF JOHN HOWARD YODER

“To my knowledge, no American (United States, Canadian, Central American or South American) Mennonite scholar has looked critically at John Howard Yoder’s written and taught theology and system of ethics through the lenses of his harassing behavior from 1970 until his death in 1997 (the years of his greatest academic productivity and the years of his sexual misconduct).” Ruth Elizabeth Krall… 2,983 more words

An Epistemology of Peace

Incompleteness is not a temporary human state while we engage in figuring out how to do theology and ethics; incompleteness is the human condition. That is why it does not matter where we begin or what language we use, provided we do not exclude other languages, but it does matter whom we listen to and whether we are able to learn to walk the word…. 335 more words

Harry Huebner

In the Strangle of Abuse: The Ethical Dilemma of Hero and Crook

This Piece Originally Appeared At: http://www.stateofformation.org/2015/05/in-the-strangle-of-abuse-the-ethical-dilemma-of-hero-and-crook/#comment-174546

Over the past several years, a moral and ethical dilemma has come up: how do we respond to the writings and works of great public heroes who have made significant contributions to their field of study while also realizing that at times these individuals did not exactly live moral lives? 952 more words