Tags » John Steinbeck

You Don't Need to be Perfect

Today’s post is one which is very close to my heart. Recently I’ve been struggling with getting the balance right in my life: I want to study and be the best physiotherapist I can be, I want to play sport and be the best player I can be, I want to get involved with my local church and be the best I can be, I want to get involved in a local youth group and be the best I can be. 493 more words

Blogs

Quote of the Day!

“Maybe ever’body in the whole damn world is scared of each other.”

~John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men

Cardón Cactus In Shades of Blue

Cardón Cactus in Shades of Blue (Guaymas, Sonora on the Sea of Cortez, January 24, 2016) — Image by kenne

“[…] it is a strange thing that most of the feeling we call religious, most of the mystical outcrying which is one of the most prized and used and desired reactions of our species, is really the understanding and the attempt to say that man is related to the whole thing, related inextricably to all reality, known and unknowable. 116 more words

Photography

Disability in Of Mice and Men

On Edexcel’s International GCSE English Literature paper in June 2014, they asked the question:

“In what ways does Steinbeck explore disability in this novel?”

The question in itself got me thinking about a whole field of knowledge that would have been taken as read for the 1930s reader and yet for the 2016 reader, can be incredibly hard to understand: disability in 1930s America. 3,222 more words

Literature

Monochrome Madness - Curves

Thank you yet again to Leanne Cole at Leanne Cole Photography for showcasing my photo for this week’s Monochrome Madness. The theme was curves. 124 more words

When is a play not a play?

The American writer, John Steinbeck (1902-1968), invented a new literary form which he called ‘the play novelette’. He described it as ‘a play that is easy to read or a short novel that can be played simply by lifting out the dialogue.’ He wrote three play novelettes, only one of which, Of Mice and Men, is well known. 965 more words

Literature