Tags » Joshua Foer

“Moonwalking With Einstein” by Joshua Foer

This book was just plain entertaining. Being able to memorize a deck of playing cards, or thousands of numbers of pi is arcane in our world of externalized memory. 2,147 more words


What Will it Take to Make Police a Learning Organization

A thought came up during a relaxed reading of a very interesting book, ‘Moonlighting with Einstein’ by Joshua Foer. The book raises a curious question. Why don’t we keep on improving our speeds at typing, running, or whatever skill one is learning, if practice, as we are told, improves performance. 523 more words

My Inner Sherlock

I just watched this TED talk by Joshua Foer:

This talk was thought-provoking for a couple of reasons. Firstly, as a Sherlock fan, it gave me hope that I too can have a brilliant memory palace of my very own (or mind palace, as Sherlock calls it). 354 more words

TED Talks

Interested in Feats of memory anyone can do? How to train your excellent spatial and navigation memory?

Interested in Feats of memory anyone can do? 

I’d like to invite you to close your eyes.

Imagine yourself standing outside the front door of your home. 3,098 more words


Book Review: Moonwalking With Einstein by Joshua Foer

I decided to purchase this book after watching Joshua Foer’s TED talk regarding feats of memory.

It is a good read and an interesting book. It goes over the general concepts of what may be called the “Memory Palace” memory technique, the very same one used by the title character of the BBC show Sherlock. 401 more words

Book Review

One Book, One Oak Park is back for 2015

Last summer, the Oak Park Public Library implemented an adult reading program titled One Book, One Park. The idea was to provide the community with a free and fun way to connect by discussing Joshua Foer’s “Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything.” 233 more words


Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

by Joshua Foer (Penguin 2011; ISBN 978-1-59420-229-2)

Reading this book, I learned a lot that I didn’t know (always a good thing!). Chief among these is perhaps the fact that before people wrote things down, printed them in books, and saved them in digital format, they did not just naturally have better memories than we do; they learned and practiced techniques that enabled them to remember better. 941 more words