Tags » Latin Roots

discreet (də̇ˈskrēt) vs. discrete (dəˈskrēt)

Invisible braces are discreet; they are unnoticeable and unobtrusive.

“Discrete” is used commonly in math or science. Discrete data is distinct and separate, it can be counted as in this set of pears and peaches. 187 more words

Etymology

complacent (kəm-plā-sənt) vs. complaisant (kəm-plā-sənt)

The squirrels were destroying our vegetable garden, but Coco remained complacent, completely unconcerned about what was happening outside.

Coco is always complaisant when she knows she will be rewarded with a treat for good behavior. 137 more words

Etymology

syzygy (si-zə-jē)

Totality took several hours to occur.

Total solar eclipse of 2017 was an awe-inspiring event.

On August 21, 2017, millions of people in North America witnessed a total solar eclipse. 313 more words

Etymology

Word Up Review

Word Up is a DVD containing ten lessons of common Greek and Latin root words and the English words we derive from them.  Each lesson lasts about twelve to fifteen minutes, covers one concept, and presents both the Greek and Latin word base word, and 10 English words that come from each. 222 more words

Resources

Terms of Venery (ve-nə-rē)

A murmuration of starlings (image from http://www.theguardian.com)

A dole of turtle doves (image from http://www.express.co.uk)

Murder of crows (image from pinterest)

A sedge of bitterns (image from pinterest) … 306 more words

Etymology

The many folds of “complicit”

After Ivanka Trump told CBS that “I don’t know what it means to be complicit,” Merriam-Webster helped her out with its definition: “Helping to commit a crime or do wrong in some way.” The dictionary, whose lexicographical sick burns have been lighting up Twitter, observed that complicit also trended back in March, used by Saturday Night Live as the name of a perfume in parody of the president’s daughter. 379 more words

Etymology