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LECTURE 9

Art Made of Data

As seen in the image above, data can be visualised and created physically as a form of art. This sculpture by Tim Dwyer, 2005, called the Time-Evolving Scatterplot, depicts the unemployment rate against inflation in 8 countries over 10 years. 25 more words

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LECTURE 8

The beauty of data visualization

There are some occasions where information is either too complicated or too distracting to comprehend on its own. In these times, visualised information and data can bring both clarity and entice the audience to become more interested in what’s being said. 205 more words

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LECTURE 6

What is data journalism

Data journalism is the process of telling stories with the use of accompanying data sources. Core-info sets, reference elements and data forms help to create a well-depicted story. 277 more words

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LECTURE 5

Presentation Styles

Comparisons are made easier with graphs, but selecting the right graph for the story or point being made is a challenge some designers fail. 200 more words

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LECTURE 4

Historical and contemporary visualization methods part 2

Why do we visualize?

The main purpose of creating data visualisations is to best convey useful and functional works which both serve their purpose and do so in a creative and thoughtful manner best suited to the type of data. 96 more words

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LECTURE 3

Historical and contemporary visualisation methods part 1

Charles Joseph Minard Published an info graph based on the campaign to invade Russia in 1812. The graphic details the distance travelled, the differing temperatures experienced and the number of casualties from beginning – end. 121 more words

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LECTURE 2

BASIC DATA TYPES

Qualitative data is non-numeric; usually consists of a variety of methods for analysation due to its lack of numeric values. Transcripts and recording are examples of this type of data and it is impossible for them to show values such as the average of a value due to its nature. 250 more words

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