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Today in Legal History

July 25th, 1974

President Nixon lost what was called “the most important battle of his political life”. On this day, by a unanimous vote, the eight Supreme Court Justices, the highest judicial forum in the United States, rejected his assertion that he had an “executive privilege” to withhold from the Watergate Special Prosecutor evidence – 64 tape recordings – needed for the impending scandal trials. 92 more words

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Marc Trabsky on Coronial Architecture and Memories of the Dead

In ‘The Custodian of Memories: Coronial Architecture in Nineteenth-century Melbourne’, Marc Trabsky, Lecturer at La Trobe Law School and Editor of the Law and Justice blog, explores the development of coronial architecture as a distinctive genre of legal architecture in Australia in the nineteenth century. 167 more words

La Trobe Law School

Petro, "After the Wrath of God"

In April, the Oxford University Press released “After the Wrath of God: AIDS, Sexuality, and American Religion,” by Anthony M. Petro (Boston University). The publisher’s description follows: 343 more words

Scholarship Roundup

  DON’T LET FEAR AND IGNORANCE STAND IN THE WAY OF TEN CENTURIES OF TRADITION

Dennis L. Blewitt, J.D.,  July, 2015

One of the most significant things I learned at the University was a social psychological theory of Mead, Piaget, and Cooley, called the looking glass theory.  1,311 more words

Constitutions And Laws

Philology Among the Disciplines (II): Roles, Limits, Goals

by John Raimo

“Those who don’t know, do theory.” As per Nikolaus Wegmann, this slogan of modern philology touches upon something odd this “ancient form of knowledge” and its persistence into the present day. 1,818 more words

Think Pieces

Lewes History Group: Bulletin 59, June 2015

Please note: this Bulletin is being put on the website one month after publication. If you would like to receive the Bulletin by email as soon as it is published, please… 961 more words

Lewes

Today in Legal History

July 1st, 1543

England and Scotland sign the Peace of Greenwich.

Following the Scottish defeat at the Battle of Solway Moss the previous year, England and Scotland signed the treaties of Greenwich on 1st July, 1543. 89 more words

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