Tags » Library Of America

Day 169 - Marheyo

Library of America, Vol. 1 – Typee, Omoo, Mardi by Herman Melville. Page 180.

“The luxurious siesta was hardly ever omitted, except by old Marheyo, who was so eccentric a character, that he seemed to be governed by no fixed principles whatever, but acting just according to the humor of the moment, slept, ate, or tinkered away at his little hut, without regard to the proprieties of time or place. 71 more words

Day 168 - Their Employments

Library of America, Vol. 1 – Typee, Omoo, Mardi by Herman Melville. Page 178.

“In truth these innocent people seemed to be at no loss for something to occupy their time; and it would be no light task to enumerate all their employments, or rather pleasures.”  12 more words

Day 167 - The History of a Day is the History of a Life

Library of America, Vol. 1 – Typee, Omoo, Mardi by Herman Melville. Page 178.

“Nothing can be more uniform and undiversified than the life of the Typees; one tranquil day of ease and happiness follows another in quiet succession; and with these unsophisticated savages the history of a day is the history of a life.”  50 more words

Day 166 - Keopuolani

Library of America, Vol. 1 – Typee, Omoo, Mardi by Herman Melville. Page 176/177.

“The notable wife of Kammahammaha, the renowned conqueror and king of the Sandwich Islands, used to pride herself in the skill she displayed in dying her tappa with contrasting colors disposed in regular figures; and, in the midst of the innovations of the times, was regarded, towards the decline of her life, as a lady of the old school, clinging as she did to the national cloth, in preference to the frippery of the European calicoes. 38 more words

Philip Roth on Life, Politics and Literary Legacy

Former American novelist reveals what he’s been doing since giving up writing back in 2010.

In an engaging email interview conducted by Charles McGrath of… 245 more words

Literature

Day 165 - Moldy Shoes

Library of America, Vol. 1 – Typee, Omoo, Mardi by Herman Melville. Page 175.

“I immediately comprehended his desires, and very generously gave him the shoes, which had become quite mouldy, wondering for what earthly purpose he could want them.  17 more words

Day 163 - Pop Gun

Library of America, Vol. 1 – Typee, Omoo, Mardi by Herman Melville. Page 173.

“Pop Pop, Pop, Pop! green guavas, seeds, and berries were flying about in every direction, and during this dangerous state of affairs I was half afraid that, like the man and his brazen bull, I should fall a victim of my own ingenuity.”   34 more words