Tags » Literary Forests

Forest and Architecture

In descriptions of the primeval forest, architectural terms are often used to describe these natural surroundings. According to Simon Schama, this is because there isn’t any way to describe the primeval forest in terms of its own. 128 more words

Forests & Trees

Reading Now: The Golden Bough

The Golden Bough by James Frazer has found its way to me from the library, and I have finally started reading it. A little late though, since I have to return it in three weeks. 48 more words

Forests & Trees

Famous Trees

CHAPTER 91.—TREES THAT HAVE BEEN RENDERED FAMOUS BY REMARKABLE EVENTS:

Pliny tells of a grove in Tusculum; formed of beeches and consecrated to the goddess Diana. 117 more words

Forests & Trees

The Plane-tree

From chapter 5, “REMARKABLE FACTS CONNECTED WITH THE PLANE-TREE”

Pliny writes about a famous plane-tree in Lycia which incidentally was situated in close proximity to a fountain “of the most refreshing coolness”. 166 more words

Forests & Trees

The Meadow

Meadow Bachelard has pointed out that the meadow, being nourished by the waters of a river, is in itself a subject of sadness, and that, in the true meadow of the soul, only asphodels grow. 34 more words

Forests & Trees

Plotless Places

Places that have never been measured or charted (never divided into plots). Also because they cannot sustain stories; they will never be stages for significant human actions. (SS, CW ~p. 168)

Forests & Trees

The Physiological Structure of Trees

Pliny (XVI:LXXII) says that there is a juice in the body of the tree which must be looked upon as their blood. The tree can be likened to the body of the human and other living things, and in general most trees have in them skin, fat, flesh, sinews, veins, blood, bones and marrow. 49 more words

Forests & Trees