Tags » Long Term Care Planning

Caretaker Child

Caretaker Child

For many seniors, owning a home is synonymous with the American Dream. The goal is to stay in the family home, and then pass it on to the next generation. 1,028 more words

Elder Law

Medicare Improvement Standard

Have you or a loved one been denied Medicare-covered services because you’re “not improving”? Many health care providers are still not aware that Medicare is required to cover skilled nursing and home care even if a patient is not showing improvement. 621 more words

HUD Announces Changes to the Federal Reverse Mortgage Program

Seniors sometimes secure and use a reverse mortgage to pay for “in-home” long-term care. Specifically, a reverse mortgage allows a homeowner who is at least 62 years old to use the equity in his or her home to obtain a loan that does not have to be repaid until the homeowner moves, sells, or dies. 439 more words

Elder Law Articles

LKG Law P.A.

LKG Law P.A.
500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 600
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-267-2207
https://www.lkglawpa.com/

LKG LAW P.A. West Palm Beach, FL is an advocate for protecting the legal rights and financial resources of senior citizens, people with disabilities, and their families in order to obtain long-term care services. 65 more words

Elder Law

Dementia Resource Publication

We have been working on a publishing project with Middle Alabama Area Agency on Aging (M4A) to produce dementia friendly resources for professionals and caregivers.  This booklet was published in June 2017 and can be read here.   37 more words

Education

Pooled Trusts & Medicaid Planning

Pooled Trusts & Medicaid Planning

A powerful tool for Medicaid planning that we are seeing more use from is a Pooled Trust. A Pooled Trust (sometimes referred to as a (d)(4)(C) trust) is a very specific type of trust used to help disabled individuals qualify for the government benefits they need while maintaining some funds set aside for things they may want to preserve the quality of life they are used to. 1,265 more words

Elder Law

Deeding Property with a Reserved Life Estate

The term “life estate” often comes up in discussions of estate and Medicaid planning, but what exactly does it mean? A life estate is a form of joint ownership that allows one person to remain in a house until his or her death, at which time it passes to the other owner, referred to as the person with the remainder interest. 721 more words

Education