Tags » Lord Acton

Religion and the Church

Of considerable interest is the struggle within the Church of Rome during the nineteenth century regarding the notion of the Infallibility of the Pope in matters of faith. 948 more words

Hugh's Blogs

Is Change In The Offing?

Years ago I wrote the following blog (with minor recent additions) which no one read and which I now realize was a bit pessimistic. Perhaps that was just how I felt at the time — or I was using hyperbole to get a response. 873 more words

Hugh's Blogs

Our Constitution: America’s Legal Conservator of Natural Law

In Law III of his Laws of Conservation and Energy, Sir Isaac Newton concluded that “To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts.” This best defines a political term of the same root word, conservatism, as the adherence according to… 842 more words

A Woman's Place

In this post I want to play the devil’s advocate, to see if any sense whatever can be made of the conservative position regarding women that would keep them in the home rather than have them compete in a man’s world (as it has come to be called). 1,330 more words

Hugh's Blogs

Tyranny of the Majority

One of the more captivating notions to come out of de Tocqueville’s truly remarkable book Democracy In America was the notion of the tyranny of the majority. 934 more words

Hugh's Blogs

Centennial of Our Lady of Fátima’s Appearance: Somber Reflections

Centennial of Our Lady of Fátima’s Appearance: Somber Reflections

By   Joseph Andrew Settanni

Yes, it will be, if no great 100th Anniversary signs and wonders appear, a time of enormous sinfulness and blasphemous doubt of the truths of the Roman Catholic Faith, regardless of there having been three shepherd children visited six times by the Holy Mother of God, every 13th of the month, May through October of 1917. 2,979 more words

Catholicism

The Aristocracy

At its founding our nation struggled with the question of whether or not an aristocracy was a good thing. Thomas Jefferson preferred a “natural aristocracy” in which the best and brightest would rise to the top of government and take control of the reins of state. 818 more words

Hugh's Blogs