Tags » Mars Exploration

Mars' toxic surface could force scientists to search for life underground

Is there life on Mars? While NASA has been attempting to answer this question since the first pictures of the Red Planet came out in the mid-1960s, a new revelation might suggest otherwise. 508 more words

News

SpaceX reusable rocket boosters to cut costs by at least 30%

The development is an important milestone that underscores humanity’s strive to being a space-faring civilisation.

In a development that is significant for Elon Musk’s space venture, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket which having accomplished its mission was recovered at sea, was once again successfully launched into orbit. 375 more words

Strategy

Mar's Volcanoes and Earth's Dinosaurs Went Extinct Same Time

Elizabeth Zubritsky
Jacob Bleacher
Jacob Richardson
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

New NASA research reveals that the giant Martian volcano Arsia Mons produced one new lava flow at its summit every 1 to 3 million years during the final peak of activity. 691 more words

News

STEAM it Up Sculptures and a Mars Colony

At the beginning of the school year in my STEAM it Up class I had the students vote on which of many possible projects they wanted to work on. 1,340 more words

Weekly Post

NRC’s Supporting Role in NASA’s Mars 2020 Launch

Don Helton
Senior Reliability and Risk Engineer

“Outer space” may not come to mind when you think about the NRC. But we’re excited to be involved with NASA in the planning for a 2020 launch of another Mars rover. 472 more words

NRC

Life on Mars? Report identifies strange rocks on Red Planet that might be filled with 'past Martian life'

A close look at photos from a defunct NASA mission may have yielded the best evidence yet for life on Mars: A series of curious-looking rocks discovered by the malfunctioning Spirit rover. 901 more words

News

China Successful Launch of CZ-5 Rocket Equal to World Strongest Now

China’s CZ-5 rocket is able to send 25 tons to lower earth orbit (LEO). In SCMP’s report today titled “Launch of China’s most powerful rocket helps Beijing close gap with US”, it quotes James Clay Moltz, a professor at the US Naval Postgraduate School in California, as saying that the rocket will allow China to match the US in operating large-scale, high performance spy satellites and global military communication satellites, as well as attempting to put up a full-sized space station, land humans on the moon or send robotic rovers to Mars. 142 more words