Tags » Meg Tuite

Exquisite Duet: Kristine Ong Muslim and Thaddeous Rutkowski

Exquisite Duet (formerly Exquisite Quartet) is not so much a composition between two writers, but rather something created within the murky midlands of each author’s mind, yet set off by the same first sentence. 571 more words

Meg Tuite

Anatomy of An Illustration: Exquisite Corpse

Oh, those macabre surrealists! They just loved to play around with the more than slightly creepy, and yet be maddeningly onto something useful and deep. “Cadavre exquis” is the collective technique in which a text or image is shared in a chain: the first artist presents a piece, the second responds, then shows it to the next, who bounces off that, and so on. 248 more words

Snapped

Exquisite Duet: Randall Brown and Rusty Barnes

Exquisite Duet (formerly Exquisite Quartet) is not so much a composition between two writers, but rather something created within the murky midlands of each author’s mind, yet set off by the same first sentence. 686 more words

Meg Tuite

New Fiction & Video Interview at Connotation Press

Prior to the Twisted Reading in Santa Fe in January, Meg Tuite suggested that while I was there we should do a video interview. My first response to this was there was no way in hell I would do such a thing. 213 more words

Exquisite Duet: Kate Braverman and Kim Chinquee

Exquisite Duet (formerly Exquisite Quartet) is not so much a composition between two writers, but rather something created within the murky midlands of each author’s mind, yet set off by the same first sentence. 835 more words

Meg Tuite

Exquisite Duet: Kaite Hillenbrand and Ken Robidoux

Exquisite Duet (formerly Exquisite Quartet) is not so much a composition between two writers, but rather something created within the murky midlands of each author’s mind, yet set off by the same first sentence. 662 more words

Meg Tuite

Exquisite Duet: Mia Avramut and Barry Graham

Exquisite Duet (formerly Exquisite Quartet) is not so much a composition between two writers, but rather something created within the murky midlands of each author’s mind, yet set off by the same first sentence. 499 more words

Meg Tuite