Tags » Melvyn Douglas

I Want to be a Clone

If I keep watching MGM films from the thirties, will I become infected? While Warners films of the period have a salutary cynicism, the main ethos of Mayer & Thalberg’s studio is patriarchal snobbery (deep down it may be just as cynical, but it would take a Sigmund Freud armed with excavation equipment to dig the true beliefs out of Louis B. 398 more words

FILM

Ninotchka

For those who haven’t yet seen it, please do. You’ll not be disappointed:

1939

Past Imperfect - #542

Sometimes the camera captures a different story than what the script or the director intended. Then again, so does life…

Humor

My Classic Movie Pick: Mr. Blandings Builds His Dreamhouse

My mom, born in 1946 and thus a baby boomer, has learned a lot about tech this past year: she knows how to take pics and post them to her Kindle, she and my dad got an Amazon firestick and know how to watch movies via streaming with that device, and she recently joined Facebook.   561 more words

Movies

La Cava-Esque

She Married Her Boss (and she does) from 1935 is an oxymoron: a sedate screwball comedy. Its rhythm is quirky and ambling, the plot taking its time to point out odd little happenings just outside the main view. 2,692 more words

Comedy

Theodora Goes Wild

Theodora Goes Wild, 1936, Columbia Pictures. Starring Irene Dunne, Melvyn Douglas. Directed by Richard Boleslawski. B&W, 94 minutes.

Raised by maiden aunts in a small New England town, Theodora Lynn (Irene Dunne) is, by all appearances, a proper, modest young woman, leading the virtuous life expected of her. 465 more words

Classic Films

Ninotchka (1939)

Ninotchka, 1939, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Starring Greta Garbo, Melvyn Douglas, Ina Claire. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. B&W, 110 minutes.

After her three comrades are taken in by the pleasures of Paris, Nina Ivanovna “Ninotchka” Yakushova (Greta Garbo) is sent by the Russian government to complete their task of selling jewelry seized from the aristocracy during the Russian Revolution. 491 more words

Classic Films