Tags » Mesolithic

Sorry, Cheddar Man: Britons Are White.

So, you’ve probably seen all the recent headlines and articles celebrating a new archaeological discovery. That the first people to arrive in Britain were, in fact, black. 793 more words

Cheddar Man

Anchored in the Past

A study undertaken by archaeologist Silje Fretheim at NTNU’s Department of Archaeology and Cultural History suggests that Late Mesolithic dwellings in Norway were maintained and repeatedly used for a period of over 1000 years. 225 more words

Archaeology & Prehistory

Natufian Shaman

This woman is a shaman from the Natufian culture, which occupied the Levantine region of the Middle East between 14-11,000 years ago. They would have lived as hunter-gatherers, but they appear to have settled down and built permanent villages instead of roaming the land as nomads, and they most probably were among the forerunners to the region’s earliest farmers. 45 more words

Artwork

Stone Age in India

Introduction

The Stone Age is also called Pre-Historic Age because we have no written records of this age. Our knowledge of the culture of this period is based only on the excavated materials and archaeology. 444 more words

Social Science - History

Straight down the line? A queer consideration of hunter-gatherer studies in Northwest Europe

Cobb, H., 2005. Straight down the line? A queer consideration of hunter-gatherer studies in north-west Europe. World Archaeology, 37(4), pp.630-636.

I came across this article while organizing all of the articles that I have collected on my computer over the years. 428 more words

Interpreting Scholarly Articles

What did you find today?

I haven’t been on many archaeology digs but I suppose it’s to be expected when you tell someone what you’re doing they invariably ask- What did you find? 750 more words

Scotland

Kiplin Hall 2014 | Lithics Chapter and Bibliography

◊ Dear Microburins

There are noises that suggest the delayed Charting Chipeling monograph about the archaeology of the Kiplin Estate in North Yorkshire may be heading towards print presses soon. 82 more words

British Archaeology