Tags » Michel Foucault

Running Into Foucault at the Supermarket

So there you are at the supermarket deciding whether or not it’s a macaroni and cheese week or more of a spaghetti week, and you turn a corner and there he is, Michel Foucault, judging wine in the wine section. 475 more words

Writing

Day 8, No. 8. Michel Foucault

HAIRCUT 100: Day 8, No. 8. Michel Foucault (1926 – 1984): philosopher, historian, political activist, S&M cruiser, tireless campaigner for dissident causes, bestselling author, and a man who believed that the Marquis de Sade ‘had not gone far enough.’ The relationship between power and knowledge lies at the heart of all Foucault’s work, and how that power is used to control and define ‘scientific knowledge’ as a means of social control. 47 more words

Alopecia

Finishing with Foucault, working on Shakespeare and now a holiday

I’ve now finished work on Foucault: The Birth of Power – the corrections to the proofs have been sent off. In the past several weeks I’ve been working hard on Shakespeare, and have got several chapters into draft state. 158 more words

Michel Foucault

The Chomsky-Foucault Debate

In 1971, Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault debated on a few topics, by no means mutually exclusive: “human nature” (or whether there was such a thing), the “ideal society”, and “justice” and “power”. 196 more words

From the Comments: Foucault's purported nationalism, and neoliberalism

Dr Stocker‘s response to my recent musings on Foucault’s Biopolitics is worth highlighting:

Good to see you’re studying Foucault Brandon.

I agree that nationalism is an issue in Foucault and that his work is very Gallocentric.

382 more words
Political Thought

Patriarchy and the Panopticon

“The woman who checks her make-up half a dozen times a day to see if her foundation has caked or her mascara run, who worries that the wind or rain may spoil her hairdo, who looks frequently to see if her stockings have bagged at the ankle, or who, feeling fat, monitors everything she eats, has become, just as surely as the inmate of Panopticon, a self-policing subject, a self committed to a relentless self-surveillance. 164 more words

Books