Tags » Michelangelo Antonioni

L'Avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, Italy, 1960)

The day after I first saw L’Avventura, I woke up thinking of art, complexity, ambiguity, the iconicity of a face and the complexity of a touch. 1,205 more words

Art House

2015 Blind Spot Series: "L'avventura"

One of the many interesting things about “L’avventura” was how it was initially received. Michelangelo Antonioni’s Italian drama debuted at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival and was booed by the audience. 943 more words

Movie Reviews - L

Last days in Paris

These are the last days of my research stay in Paris and I’m trying to get the most out of it, mainly in terms of visiting museums (the brand new and magnificent Fondation Luis Vuitton – in an overwhelming ‘sailing ship’ building by Frank Gehry, I discovered the touching work of Helene Schjerfbeck and enjoyed some classics, most notably some playful works of Picasso and the juxtaposition of Giacometti drawings with Bacon paintings –, the unavoidable Louvre – or at least its stunning Near Eastern collection – and yes, even the Eiffel Tower) and grabbing the many opportunities to attend special film screenings. 429 more words

Cinema

Film School, Italian Style

I’m delighted to share my post on the magical legacy of Italian neorealist film for the Johns Hopkins University Press blog! Read here…

Top 10 Films of the 1960s

This piece first appeared almost a year ago on the now defunct web journal The Samizdat. I realized in rereading it to post here that it omits one of my absolute favorites – The Cincinnati Kid. 1,289 more words

Film

Viewing Diary: Profondo Rosso (1975, Dario Argento)

Profondo Rosso (Dario Argento, 1975)

David Hemmings plays an English pianist in Turin who witnesses the brutal murder of a German medium and becomes drawn into an obsessive quest for the killer, based on visual clues and cues. 346 more words

Reviews

This Week at The Hand Grenade's Headquarters #21

If you immediately think of The Queen when one mentions Helen Mirren and defend that Michael Gambon wasn’t a Dumbledore as good as Richard Harris (the first one), then you can do worse than watching The Cook, the Thief, the Wife and His Lover, a work of complete political rage and artistic passion that is so aggressive it may be too much for some. 533 more words

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