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Bullet physics: player collision

In my last post Bullet physics: user pointer I was able detect the collision of two balls in my virtual world.

But how can I detect whether one of the balls collides with me (or, more precisely, the virtual me)? 525 more words

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Bullet physics: user pointer

In my post Bullet physics: collision detection I determined whether two balls had collided in a virtual world by inspecting an isNonMoving() function. But this was shit. 331 more words

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Bullet physics: collision detection

Sharon was walking about with a hammer. ‘Gonna knock something,’ she repeated menacingly.

I took an apple from the bowl and waved her over. ‘What about this,’ I said calmly. 350 more words

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Bullet physics: balls collide

Arkwood plucked the teardrops he shed, nestled in the soft grass. And smashed them over a rock. ‘Never again! Not in this world!’ he raged. 281 more words

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Bullet physics: friction

Arkwood pressed the palm of his hand against the window. ‘That’s friction.’

Well, yes. Full friction. ‘Now try moving your hand down,’ I said.

But his face broke into intense alarm. 204 more words

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Bullet physics: restitution at angle

In my previous post, Bullet physics: restitution, I used Bullet Real-Time Physics Simulation to bounce a ball on a table in my virtual world. 263 more words

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Bullet physics: restitution

Arkwood held his police records aloft and said, ‘Every action has a reaction.’

I threw my chopsticks in the air, ‘Of course!’

I cranked open my C++ Microsoft Visual Studio application (with OpenGL graphics library and the Oculus SDK for Windows) and added some bounce to my ball. 138 more words

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