Tags » Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Striking a balance: deep sea mining and ecosystem protection

Thousands of feet below the ocean’s surface lies a hidden world of undiscovered species, ancient animals and unique seabed habitats—as well as a vast untapped store of natural resources including valuable metals and rare-earth minerals. 358 more words

Ocean Policy

Is Opisthoteuthis Adorabilis the most adorable Octopus?

In even more Octopus news, you might have seen recent reports on a new species that’s been discovered. The Octopus in the image above is one of twelve that have been studied and so far they’ve all been female. 137 more words

Steampunk

Killer Sponges

NationalGeographic.com reported –

There are about 8,500 species of sponges, a type of simple, mostly stationary invertebrate, and the vast majority passively filter their food on the seafloor. 39 more words

'Punk Rock' Sea Snail Gets Named After The Clash's Joe Strummer By Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

A sea snail that lives in the depths of the Pacific near hydrothermic vents has been named in honor of late The Clash lead vocalist and guitarist Joe Strummer. 209 more words

Features

Monterey researchers take first-ever known video of mysterious black seadevil

Published November 22, 2014

FoxNews.com

Research team captured first-ever video of a rarely-seen denizen of the deep called the black seadevil while conducting a dive in Monterey Bay, Calif.  228 more words

Humor And Observations

What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t

‘…Let’s move to the western Amazon, which is really the epicenter of isolated peoples. Each of these dots represents a small, uncontacted tribe, and the big reveal today is we believe there are 14 or 15 isolated groups in the Colombian Amazon alone. 371 more words

News

Monterey Bay Submarine Captures Elusive 'Black Seadevil' Anglerfish On Video

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – The spooky deep sea creature that nearly lured in Marlin and Dory with his bioluminescence in the Pixar film ‘Finding Nemo’ has been captured on video by researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. 190 more words

News