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The Descent (2005) Film Review | 365 Day Film Challenge - Day 26

I had heard nothing but amazing things about this film, so I went in with fairly high expectations. I’m pleased to say that The Descent… 338 more words

Film

Film #218: The Descent (2005)

director: Neil Marshall
language: English
length: 99 minutes
watched on: 4 August 2016

We actually watched three films in one day – the first was… 605 more words

Films

Movie Review - The Descent

Released in 2005, The Descent is a British horror movie that does away with haunted mansions, abandoned asylums, handheld cams, and other tired horror tropes. Instead we follow the spelunking (what a fun word to say) adventures of six women as they stumble into an uncharted cave within the Appalachian Mountains. 863 more words

Movie Review

Tales Of Halloween

Directors: Darren Lynn Bousman, Neil Marshall & others
Starring: Adrienne Barbeau, Joe Dante & John Landis
Synopsis: Watch in terror as ghosts, ghouls, monsters, aliens, axe murderers and the devil himslef delight in terrorising the unsuspecting residents of one American suburban neighbourhood across one heart-stopping Halloween night. 1,062 more words

Film Review

Tales of Halloween review

By Paul Downey

It’s been a year since the release of horror anthology Tales of Halloween, but the film is now finally getting a DVD and Blu Ray release in the UK. 218 more words

Franchise Weekend - The Descent (2005)

Director: Neil Marshall

Writer: Neil Marshall (Screenplay)

Starring: Shauna Macdonald, Natalie Mendoza, Alex Reid, Saskia Mulder, MyAnna Buring, Nore-Jane Noone

 

Plot: A caving expedition goes horribly wrong, as the explorers become trapped and ultimately pursued by a strange breed of predators. 800 more words

Thriller

The Crude Human Animal: H. P. Lovecraft and "The Descent"

There are many films that can be considered Lovecraftian horror on a surface level—John Carpenter’s The Thing, what with its preponderance of tentacled limbs and its Antarctic setting, probably chief among them—but if I had to pick which movie best represents Lovecraft’s thematic concerns, artistic trappings, and general aura, it wouldn’t be one of these pseudopod-wriggling entities (admirable as I find many of them). 2,268 more words

Literature