Washington in the 1830s

We often see politicians as living exciting lives today filled with much media attention. It wasn’t always so.

In a letter dated December 18, 1835 John Norvell, soon to be a US Senator, wrote to Kate Mason commenting on his life in Washington: 494 more words

American History

Up in the Air so Blue

When you fly in the military there is a path that you follow.  All do it.   You start as a student flier, earn your wings, become qualified in a certain aircraft, move on as a squadron member, and then if you are proficient, and do well, become an instructor for others. 469 more words

American History

Yellow Fever takes a Life

Yellow fever was a major killer in the 19th Century.   It was often called the American plague.  New Englander Cotton Mather described it as “turning yellow then vomiting and bleeding every way.”   It was spread by a species of the female mosquito and repeatedly killed thousands in the 19th Century.     477 more words

American History

How does it feel...?

So there I was flying combat missions daily in the F4 over Cambodia in 1973 and a letter comes from my sister and she asks “How does it feel to kill someone?”  To say it pissed me off at the time is an understatement .  381 more words

American History

My Grandfather and the "Ghosts"

My mother’s father was quite a story teller,  when we were kids he often told us of his youth in the northern part of New York State, here is one of his tales about  so-called “Ghosts.”  He explained it this way: 479 more words

American History

Forgotten Gettysburg

There is a somewhat forlorn battlefield to the east of Gettysburg that few visit. It is located near a shopping area off the route 30 corridor. 451 more words

American History

Lipscomb Norvell and the Seige of Charleston

The Siege of Charleston  in 1780, during the American Revolution,  marked a British shift of focus towards southern colonies.

After failing to achieve any advantage in the north, in 1779 the British government sent a combined military and naval expedition of 7,600 strong under General Henry Clinton by sea to South Carolina. 420 more words

American History