Tags » NYRB Classics

Marines return home in time for Father’s Day

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. (WNCT) – Around 100 Marines stationed at Camp Lejuene returned home Sunday, just in time for Father’s Day.

Hundreds gathered to welcome the Marines home. 151 more words

U.S. & World News

Agostino by Alberto Moravia (tr. Michael F. Moore)

First published in the mid-1940s, Alberto Moravia’s novella, Agostino, is a striking portrayal of the passing of a young boy’s innocence over the course of a seemingly idyllic summer. 1,408 more words

Book Reviews

Young Man with a Horn by Dorothy Baker

Dorothy Baker’s Cassandra at the Wedding was one of my reading highlights of 2014 and ever since then I’ve been looking forward to trying her debut, the jazz novel, … 1,521 more words

Book Reviews

Finishing my #TBR20 – a few reflections

Some of you may have noticed that I’ve been tagging my recent reviews with #TBR20. You may have heard about this initiative on twitter, or read about it posts by other bloggers ( 1,281 more words

Book Reviews

Three Bedrooms in Manhattan by Georges Simenon (review)

First published in 1946, Simenon’s Three Bedrooms in Manhattan features a forty-eight-year-old down-and-out actor named François Combe. François has come to Manhattan to escape the scrutiny of the Paris milieu following his wife’s decision to leave him for a much younger (and less talented) actor. 1,023 more words

Book Reviews

A Way of Life, Like Any Other, by Darcy O’Brien (review)

Darcy O’Brien was the son of actor George O’Brien (star of several silent films and 1930s Westerns), and stage and screen actress Marguerite Churchill, a frequent co-star of John Wayne. 1,556 more words

Book Reviews

Mamma, Can I Break My Piggy Bank? (Agostino by Alberto Moravia, trans. Michael F. Moore)

One might describe Alberto Moravia’s 1944 novella Agostino (NYRB Classics 2014) as a coming-of-age or loss-of-innocence story, but one ought not, for either would be an imprecise—that is, lazy—classification, an affront to this great work’s essential liminality. 163 more words

Three-Sentence Reviews