Tags » Okies

Swing low, sweet cities

Coming in from a warm, Spring day, when the first fruits are starting to be picked, the Beamers instead contemplated the “decline of the West” and its replacement by the entire rest of the Galaxy, as depicted in James Blish’s classic novels of itinerant metropolises, … 1,429 more words

Science Fiction

Nice Lady Therapists and their war against human emotion: class, disability, and culture.

Developmental disability service agencies often teach each other a set of cultural biases about how emotions are meant to be displayed.  Even if office workers didn’t come from that cultural background already, the agency molds them into that shape.  2,509 more words

Developmental Disability Service System

The Farm Security Administration and the Okie Myth

              The Farm Security Administration (FSA), played a big part in the creation of the Okie legend. Art Historian Cara Finnegan says that “Many in the early years of the twentieth century did not believe that rural poverty existed.” 635 more words

African-American Experience

Exodus: Black Okie Migration

            THE MIGRATION numbers for African Americans in Oklahoma are difficult to pin down because although there was a statewide net loss of only 3,349 or 2% of the total population of African Americans in the state between 1930 and 1940, this same period saw huge changes in black residency. 1,456 more words

African-American Experience

Organizing

         Before they migrated out of their home states, many Okie and Arkie sharecropping, and tenant farmers organized to try to negotiate for more humane economic deals with plantation owners. 670 more words

African-American Experience

Racism and Relief

          Although Oklahoma had its share of middle class black citizens, not all, nor even most African Americans enjoyed a stable economic existence. As was so common across the cotton belt, many Oklahoman farmers were sharecroppers. 1,629 more words

African-American Experience

Sharecropping

          Although Oklahoma had its share of middle class black citizens, not all, nor even most African Americans enjoyed a stable economic exitance. As was so common across the cotton belt, many Oklahoman farmers were sharecroppers. 827 more words

African-American Experience