Gabriel García Márquez, Minus Magical Realism 

I bought the book El coronel no tiene quien le escriba (No One Writes to the Colonel) a few months ago for the unconvincing reason that the title put me in mind of my father (it’s lucky he doesn’t read English so he can’t take offence). 131 more words

Tasters

WWW Wednesday, 23-December-2015

Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme was formerly hosted by MizB at Should be Reading and revived here on Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. 529 more words

Books

# 83. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez (Catharina)

I thought this book was fantastic. Such a lovely mix between reality and magic! Which believe it or not actually is its own genre called Magic Realism. 211 more words

Catharina

Lit Matters: Book Bonds

by Susanna Donato

Like most writers, I first was a reader, beginning when I was too young to realize that most people didn’t read as if it were a competitive sport, perhaps even a contact sport, requiring hours of daily training and muscles honed to carry stacks of library books. 612 more words

One Hundred Years of Solitude / Gabriel García Márquez

One Hundred Years Of Solitude is a great book and is worthy of its place on the ‘classics’ shelf. It shares a lot of similarities in style to the Bible; It can be a slog at times and while its language is not as verbose, the wealth of characters who share homes and names and lovers can confuse. 1,245 more words

Books

A limited acquaintance: Latin American writers

My acquaintance with the literature of Latin America is very limited: I’m familiar with some of the novels of the Columbian Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and the short stories of the Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges. 422 more words

Fiction

Gabriel García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude

At that time Colonel Aureliano Buendia took the time to send a detailed account to Macondo every two weeks. But only once, almost eight months after he had left, did he write to Úrsula. 744 more words

Literature