Tags » Patient Empowerment

Reading my EHR as a way to prepare

I’m waiting for my primary care center to call me back, and while I’m waiting I log into my online electronic health record. It’s always good to be prepared. 557 more words

Patient Experience

Should You or Shouldn't You?

It was Shakespeare’s Hamlet who wondered “To be, or not to be”; but in health care, the question is altogether different: It’s “Should I, or shouldn’t I?” 524 more words

Physician Adherence

This amazing facebook post by equally amazing Hugo Campos deserves a blog post all to itself. Enjoy!

Hugo turns the table on the old, worn out terms “compliance” and “adherence” which are usually used to describe patients and their behaviour – and what’s not to love! 54 more words

#blogg100

Is blood glucose 30 really high or really low?

Did I mention my dad had a blood glucose level of 30 the other day? We were really freaked out because it was so HIGH – and the homecare nurse immediately came and administrated insulin. 446 more words

#blogg100

Seek and Thee Shall Find

Getting sick is the pits, but especially if you have diabetes. Medicines and illness often raise blood sugars.  Finding treatments that help  the momentary ailment without affecting blood sugars is one mighty challenge, one I met today and feel like crowing about! 498 more words

Type I Diabetes

Navigating unknown cancer waters

I downloaded this report “På okänt cancervatten” a while ago, but I’ve only been able to read short sections at a time. Not because I haven’t had time to (which is otherwise a common reason for my fragmented reading habits) but because it hurts. 587 more words

#blogg100

Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment

Source: British Journal of Nursing 25/3

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. 146 more words

Volume 7 Issue 3