Tags » Paul Gilroy

Twilight City 1989

Publisert 11. apr. 2014

A fictional letter from a daughter, Olivia, to her mother in Dominica is the narrative thread connecting interviews from (predominantly) black and Asian cultural critics, historians and journalists. 285 more words

Hugh Muir Reviews “90 Degrees of Shade: Image and Identity in the West Indies”

90 Degrees of Shade: Image and Identity in the West Indies – 100 Years of Photography in the Caribbean (Soul Jazz Books, 2014) is a new photography book that examines culture, politics, religion and tourism in the Caribbean over the past century. 401 more words

Caribbean Culture

New Book: Stuart Baker’s “90 Degrees of Shade: Image and Identity in the West Indies – 100 Years of Photography in the Caribbean”

90 Degrees of Shade: Image and Identity in the West Indies – 100 Years of Photography in the Caribbean, edited by Stuart Baker, with a foreword by Paul Gilroy was published by Soul Jazz Books (2014). 344 more words

Caribbean Culture

FROM THE ARCHIVES: BETWEEN CAMPS

Continuing to plunder the archives while I am away, this is the third in my series of old book reviews on the theme of race, identity and difference. 1,318 more words

Culture & Books

Paul Gilroy, "The Struggle against Racism in Britain (1976-2012): Its Implications for Justice and Democracy"

By Nicole Tan

Our running feet stopped when we saw the line ahead of us. A line that wound up being two flights of stairs with no end point in sight. 860 more words

FemGeniuses In Berlin

British Cultural Studies and the Pitfalls of Identity, Paul Gilroy

If stereotyping helps define the dominant order by excluding a marginalized other, then the concept of a national identity may not be too different. This is what Paul Gilroy explains in his piece “British Cultural Studies and the Pitfalls of Identity.” By looking into the social construction of national identity, he questions what purpose it serves in the larger social landscape. 435 more words

Culture And Mass Media

Paul Gilroy - Offshore Humanism: Human Rights and Hydrarchy

Modern port cities have always been special places. They were nodal points on the intersecting webs of trade, information and accumulation. At the quayside, land-based sovereignty confronted the unruly force of rivers and oceans as well as the distinctive habits, peregrinations and insubordinate mentalities of those who worked upon the waters. 2,429 more words

Writings