Tags » Perichoresis

Perichoresis

Neither hot nor cold but perfectly
temperate – we watch and celebrate
her waving and turning, singing and
smiling, echoing and flying, through
and around and above and beneath…

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Daily

Dancing Freedom

How we understand God has a lot to do with how we understand freedom. 

In working on my recently published book Charter of Christian Freedom… 1,421 more words

Bible

LEARNING ABOUT HOTEL LIFE

Written February 21st

For our first day, my coworker, Dia, and I met Alexandra in the morning and drove to meet a Pentecostal couple in town – the husband is a pastor at the local Pentecostal congregation in Katerini and the wife is an English teacher with over 30 years’ experience in the field. 397 more words

VISITING PERICHORESIS

From February 20-27, 2017 I had the pleasure to volunteer in Katerini with the Evangelical Church in Greece’s affiliated refugee-aid non-profit, Perichoresis. I first served with the ECG in Katerini in August 2016 after meeting Alexandra Nikolara, the team leader for refugee aid work there, at a Consultation on Migration hosted by the Reformed Church in Hungary in June 2016. 430 more words

Perichoresis in Aquinas: Fruit, not Foundation

“Perichoresis” or, in Latin, circumincessio, has been a fairly traditional term in trinitarian theology since at least the time of John of Damascus. Before he applied it to the trinitarian issue, it was used to speak of the mutual interpenetration of the human and divine natures of Christ in the incarnation. 1,356 more words

Theology

A Final Word

This post will be my last for Trinity and Humanity. I’ve been writing here for 8 years, I’ve enjoyed it very much, and now it is time for something new. 334 more words

Trinity

A Roundup of Recent Reviews of Rohr & Morrell's Divine Dance

Sanders said: And my long—forgive me—review has one main point: it’s that The Divine Dance isn’t about the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. It’s a book about an alternative spirituality of Flow, committed to a metaphysic that refuses to recognize a distinction between God and the world. 319 more words