Tags » Physiology

Beijing: What I did, what I saw and what I learned

Please note this post will be updated again once I have left China – this is due to censorship and internet quality.

Recently, I was afforded the opportunity to visit… 1,504 more words

Sports Science

Physiological responses of gray mullet Mugil cephalus to low-pH water

We examined changes in the physiological responses of gray mullet Mugil cephalus exposed to acidic seawater (pH 6.0, 6.5, 7.0) and normal seawater (pH 8.0, control) for 15 days. 174 more words

Science

Combined effects of elevated pCO2 and warming facilitate Cyanophage infections

Elevated pCO2 and warming are generally expected to influence cyanobacterial growth, and may promote the formation of blooms. Yet, both climate change factors may also influence cyanobacterial mortality by favoring pathogens, such as viruses, which will depend on the ability of the host to adapt. 293 more words

Science

Combined effects of sea water acidification and copper exposure on the symbiont-bearing foraminifer Amphistegina gibbosa

Coral reefs are threatened by global and local stressors such as ocean acidification and trace metal contamination. Reliable early warning monitoring tools are needed to assess and monitor coral reef health. 278 more words

Science

Acid–base physiology, neurobiology and behaviour in relation to CO2-induced ocean acidification

Experimental exposure to ocean and freshwater acidification affects the behaviour of multiple aquatic organisms in laboratory tests. One proposed cause involves an imbalance in plasma chloride and bicarbonate ion concentrations as a result of acid–base regulation, causing the reversal of ionic fluxes through GABAA receptors, which leads to altered neuronal function. 142 more words

Science

Cardiologist's Kitchen

Barely a month goes by without a national newspaper displaying words like “science says _________ is bad for your health”.

I concede that *some* of these headlines might be correct, but it’s worth taking them with a pinch of salt, if you’ll pardon the pun; firstly, “science” isn’t an all-powerful being that performs every possible study single-handedly, so it’s difficult to know exactly who has put forth the particular claim and how many people through whom the information has passed before it gets to the news media, and secondly, “science says…” doesn’t necessarily mean it’s double-blind, peer-reviewed, evidence-based or ethically funded, so between the debunked results of Andrew Wakefield’s infamous autism/ MMR study and big pharmaceutical companies potentially protecting their interests by omitting unfavourable study data, it isn’t a great idea to believe that eating bacon causes your lips to fall off, simply because the junior science editor for The Daily Express tells you it does. 662 more words

TSP Blog

The impacts of seawater acidification on Ruditapes philippinarum sensitivity to carbon nanoparticles

In the present study, the impacts of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), one of the most important NMs used in broad industrial and biomedical applications, on the clam Ruditapes philippinarum were evaluated under actual and predicted ocean acidification conditions. 160 more words

Science