Tags » Plymouth Brethren

Classic of the Month: Father and Son by Edmund Gosse

I can’t believe how long it’s taken me to get to this splendid evocation of 1850s–60s family life in an extreme religious sect. I’d known about Edmund Gosse’s… 856 more words

Nonfiction Reviews

Two Hymns & Songs Christian Love & Loving Christ

Two Hymns & Songs Christian Love & Loving Christ

Christian Hearts in Love United. HerrnHut (Lord’s House (Watch, Covering, Hiding-Place))

In preparation of Reflections Concerning Church Missions it seems most appropriate to share these two Hymnal Songs with brief remarks as to their story and significance. 2,593 more words

Illustrated Scrapbook of Leonard Sheldrake in the Christian Brethren Archive now Online

Dr Graham Johnson writes:

This extensive annotated scrapbook was produced by Leonard Sheldrake (1885-1952) during his travels around the United States as an itinerant preacher in the 1930s. 344 more words

Archives

Brethren’s Meeting Room, Ermine Street, Colliers End

Up a short drive off Ermine Street between Colliers End and St Edmund’s College. This was a bungalow that was adapted, under temporary planning permission in 2012, into a meeting room with car parking. 24 more words

Brethren

WOMEN’S HEADCOVERINGS?

 

Review:

The Truth of Headship and Its Symbolic Practice:

A Study of God’s Grace & Government

Stephen Hulshizer

Spread the Word

50 pp.; pb

Stephen Hulshizer raises a question about a practice not often observed today, viz., the practice of women wearing headcoverings in public worship.  920 more words

Morality / Ethics

THE NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH

 

Review:

Characteristics of a New Testament Church

Robert Gessner

Spread the Word, 2000

24 pp., p.b.

Robert Gessner is affiliated with a fellowship of believers generally known to outsiders as the “Plymouth Brethren,” although they themselves eschew any denominational titles.  648 more words

The Acid Bath Murders

Yesterday evening I watched a chilling though fascinating programme about the acid bath murderer, John George Haigh. Born into a deeply religious family (his parents where Plymouth Brethren, a strict protestant sect), Haigh progressed from terms of imprisonment for fraud to murdering 6 people. 171 more words

Books