Tags » Pre-raphaelites

Red House: Art meets Craft

After leaving Emmetts Garden on our way home from Sussex last week, we also stopped off to see a place that I’ve wanted to visit for a long time- Red House, in Bexleyheath, London. 256 more words

Garden

Sunday Morning --- Victoriana of the Week

That’s the familiar face of Jane Morris once again, posing for Dante Gabriel Rossetti at a time when the two were in the midst of an affair. 157 more words

Art

Social and Religious Themes in English Art 1840 – 1860 by Lindsay Errington Part 5

Chapter VII is where the subject in hand comes into its own. Having mentioned Millais’ Christ in the House of his Parents (1849, Tate) through the words of Dickens etc, it is prudent and certainly proves to be, to examine the work through the eyes of Millais (as far as possible). 5,413 more words

Pre-Raphaelites

Exhibition to visit this week – Great British Drawings at the Ashmolean

I’ve been trying to get to the Great British Drawings at the Ashmolean in Oxford for weeks now, but events keep conspiring against me. It looks great – the blurb is “See the very best of British drawings and watercolours exhibited together for the first time.” and there are lots of big names included – Gainsborough and Turner, all the pre-Raphaelites, Walter Sickert, David Hockney and many others. 54 more words

Art

“No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.”

One of my favorite blogs ever is The Pre-Raphaelite Sisterhood, run by the lovely Stephanie Piña. The PRS was responsible for me feeling that I wasn’t alone in my love of the Brotherhood and I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t know nearly as much about the Brotherhood without the blog. 62 more words

Pre-raphaelites

'Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white'

by ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white;

Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;

Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font: 107 more words

Poetry

Sunday Morning --- Victoriana of the Week

These six paintings are called “The Days of Creation.”   The artist was Sir Edward Burne-Jones.

The first painting contains a single angel, and then the number of angels increases by one with each day, until there are six angels in the final picture.    148 more words

Art