Tags » Primes

Sharing Numberphile's Goldbach Conjecture video with kids

Numberphile released a really nice video about the Goldbach Conjecture today:

I thought it would make an excellent project with the boys even though some of the ideas involving logarithms might be over their head. 322 more words

On a set that detects the convergence of a sum of reciprocals using relative density: A proposal for an indicator set and a proof of its nonexistence.

Natural Density

Suppose we take a subset of the natural numbers and look at the sum of the reciprocals of its elements:

One question we can ask here is: for which subsets does this sumĀ converge? 797 more words

MathematicalADD

Sharing Grant Sanderson's "Pi and Primes" video with kids part 2:

Grant Sanderson’s latest video explaining a connection between pi and prime numbers is absolutely fantastic:

This video is sort of at the edge of what kids can understand, but it was fun to explore a few of the ideas with them even if understanding 100% of the video was probably not realistic. 294 more words

Sharing Grant Sanderson's "Pi and Primes" video with kids. Part 1

Grant Sanderson has a new (and, as usual, incredible) video on “Pi hiding in prime regularities”:

By coincidence, we’ve done a project on this topic before: 387 more words

Sharing Kelsey Houston-Edwards's Cryptography video with kids

I’m falling way behind on Kelsey Houston-Edwards’s video series, sadly. Her “How to Break Crytography” video is so freaking amazing that it needed to be first in line in my effort to catch up! 263 more words

A Geometric Sieve for the Prime Numbers

In the time before computers (BC) various ingenious devices were invented for aiding the extensive calculations required in astronomy, navigation and commerce. In addition to calculators and logarithms, several… 438 more words

Occasional

A nice problem about primes for kids from James Tanton

Saw a really cool tweet from James Tanton today:

What is the average power of a given prime p among the prime factorizations of the counting numbers?

397 more words