Tags » Puritanism

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

This sermon by Jonathan Edwards, first delivered in 1741, is one of the works of American literature that I have never read before becoming an English teacher. 200 more words

In The Classroom

John Owen and English Spirituality (Gribben)

by Crawford Gribben.

Crawford Gribben suggests, perhaps ironically, that John Owen’s life is shaped around a series of “defeats.” The major moments and triumphs of Owen’s life appear to have been frustrated: the godly republic, the vision of a godly university, and the failure of Independency.    324 more words

Book Review

In 1635, Richard Mather, father of Cotton & grandfather of Increase, arrives in Boston.

American Puritans

August 17, 1635: Richard Mather arrives in Boston, beginning the “Mather Dynasty” in New England Puritanism that also included his son, Cotton, and grandson, Increase.

America

Review: Puritan Theology (Beeke and Jones)

Beeke, Joel.  and Jones, Mark.  Puritan Theology: Doctrine for Life.  Grand Rapids, MI: Reformation Heritage Books.

This is one of those “game-changer” books.  Beeke provides decades of pastoral reflection from the Puritans (and admittedly, there is a lot of repetition) while Jones brings clear Christological reflection from giants like Thomas Goodwin and John Owen.   710 more words

Book Review

John Owen Communion With God (Works 2)

My copy of Owen was from his Works, volume 2.  Nonetheless, this review will also serve for the shorter Puritan Paperbacks edition.  following the review is an outline on the book. 591 more words

Book Review

Review: Thomas Vincent on the Shorter catechism

This is the “unofficial” commentary on the Westminster Shorter Catechism, having received imprimaturs from John Owen and Thomas Watson.  It differs from Watson’s in that it follows a more exegetical approach to the Catechism (though Watson’s is written with more verve). 248 more words

Book Review

It's Not Easy Being Mike Pence

When I look at Mike Pence

I think of H.L.Mencken

who once said

that Puritanism

is  “the haunting fear

that someone, somewhere

might be happy”.

Poetry