Tags » Reginald Marsh

Minnie Cooper and John McClendon in Faulkner's "Dry September"

Last Thursday, I wrote about the “blank spaces” in William Faulkner’s “Dry September” and some works by Ernest J. Gaines. Today, I want to look at a couple of scenes in Faulkner’s story and discuss the ways that Faulkner delves into the psychological effects of lynchings and racial violence on the perpetrators themselves. 962 more words

American Literature

Paul Merton in Galton & Simpson's Being of Sound Mind

Following the death of Enoch Merton, his family meet for the reading of his will.  Paul is astonished to discover that the man he believed to be his uncle was actually his father, and is further shocked – and delighted – to learn he’s been left Enoch’s fortune (some five hundred thousand pounds).  635 more words

Galton And Simpson

The bums and barflies on a 10th Avenue corner

“Well-bred people are no fun to paint,” Reginald Marsh once reportedly said.

Known for his exaggerated, carnival-like paintings of crowds of showgirls, shoppers, and Coney Island beach-goers… 106 more words

Music, Art, Theater

Summer in the City

The July 1927 issues of the New Yorker were filled with news of yacht races, polo matches and golf tournaments as the city settled into the heart of the summer. 605 more words

The New Yorker Magazine

A painter renders Union Square's sea of humanity

Shop girls, down and out men, lone pedestrians on the way to the elevated train—from the 1930s to the 1980s, Isabel Bishop observed these men and women from her Union Square artist’s studio, painting them in soft tones that reveal their humanity and fragility. 437 more words

Union Square

Reginald Marsh and Coney Island

There’s so much craziness taking place in this country at this point in time.  I wanted to write something that would plead for our patience and tolerance,  asking us to avoid the knee jerk reactions, finger-pointing and extreme behaviors that have brought us here.   705 more words

Favorite Things

Down on his luck at the Brooklyn docks in 1938

Reginald Marsh painted the city’s extremes: gaudy, seedy Coney Island, sex at burlesque shows, Bowery revelry, and the might and strength symbolized by ships and industry. 46 more words

Brooklyn