Tags » Review - Novels

Olive Ann Burns, Cold Sassy Tree (Review)

As I explained in my post last year on Annie Dillard’s The Maytrees, we are slowly listening to some of the audiobooks we gave Mr Gums’ mother in the last years of her life, and have just finished Olive Ann Burn’s epic-length, … 775 more words

Women Writers

Louise Mack, The world is round (Review)

I’ve had Louise Mack’s debut novel, The world is round, on my TBR for about 20 years. Published in 1896, when she was 26 years old, it’s a fairly straightforward tragicomedy about a young well-to-do 21-year-old girl, Jean, who aspires to be a writer, and the two men who love her, the 30-plus-year-old self-confident, successful lawyer-and-writer Musgrave, and the around-25-year-old, shy and financially struggling Harrison. 1,292 more words

Australian Literature

Elizabeth Jolley, An innocent gentleman (Mini-Review)

Note: this is a mini-review compiled from the notes I made when I read Elizabeth Jolley’s An innocent gentleman before blogging. I found them on some scrappy pieces of paper while decluttering and figured my blog is the best place to keep them … not floating in some drawer somewhere! 511 more words

Australian Literature

Pierre Lemaitre, The great swindle (Review)

As I was reading Pierre Lemaitre’s literary page-turner, The great swindle, I started to wonder about the endings of books, what I look for, what I most appreciate. 1,160 more words

21st Century Literature

Josephine Rowe, A loving, faithful animal (Review)

How many novels have you read featuring the Vietnam War? I’ve not read many I must say, but last year I did review Charles Hall’s… 1,001 more words

Australian Literature

Anthony Doerr, All the light we cannot see (Review)

Just when you thought that there couldn’t possibly be another angle to writing about World War 2, up comes another book that does just that, like, for example, Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer prize-winning  1,386 more words

21st Century Literature

Ariella Van Luyn, Treading air (Review)

It wasn’t until I reached the end of Ariella Van Luyn’s debut novel, Treading air, that I discovered it was loosely based on the life of a real person. 1,166 more words

Australian Literature