Tags » Richard Louv

Inside Outside

I love Pixar. I grew up on Disney with its iconic faerie tales full of talking animals and shadowy woods and deep seas. You know what to expect from a Disney film: Walt said so once, something lost in the depths of my memory dump, something about going into a Disney movie and it not letting you down with a downer ending. 498 more words

Environment

LAST CHILD IN THE WOODS: SAVING OUR CHILDREN FROM NATURE-DEFICIT DISORDER by Richard Louv

“A kid today can likely tell you about the Amazon rain forest — but not about the last time he or she explored the woods in solitude, or lay in a field listening to the wind and watching the clouds move.” (pp. 48 more words

Books I Recommend

Deep Learning Continues at Avon OLC

Guest blogger Jennifer Davies updates us on her work at Central Indiana’s Avon Outdoor Learning Center. We first posted about this phenomenal program last February, in… 474 more words

Resilience

Go Outside and Play

“The future will belong to the nature-smart—those individuals, families, businesses, and political leaders who develop a deeper understanding of the transformative power of the natural world and who balance the virtual with the real.

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Articles

What's in a name?

After multiple recommendations, I am finally making time to read Richard Louv’s Last Child in the Woods.  It has taken me back to the days when my friends and I played football on our dirt road, encountered a variety of wildlife, and wandered fearlessly through the woods and around the neighborhood.  366 more words

Conservation

Last Week of Winter

This year I am documenting an experience I have had every year since 1995. After the snow melts every March, I dust off my bike and return to my favorite warm-weather passion – biking on the Loveland Bike Trail. 431 more words

Loveland Bike Trail

The Attentiveness Of Walking

“You must walk like a camel, which is said to be the only beast which ruminates while walking.”

                             Thoreau (Journal, October 31st, 1850)

It’s something we hear, and are told, often. 1,031 more words