Tags » Rock Aesthetics

The Greatest Point: Nilsson, "The Most Beautiful World In The World" (1972)


Even joke music means something, right? Because otherwise, why go to the trouble of striking a jokey attitude? You’re making some kind of run at what you’re joking about. 432 more words

Rock Aesthetics

The Ten-Year Hook: The Rolling Stones, "Rocks Off" (1972)


As the poetically inevitable result of my complaint about The Trouble with Horns, Matt Smith made me a mix of great horn parts in rock (posted now in… 392 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Experimental: Pere Ubu, "30 Seconds Over Tokyo" (1975)

You’re in a hole-in-the-wall record shop rooting around in a singles bin and you find a release by Pere Ubu (Pere Ubu!) called “30 Seconds Over Tokyo.” That’s the hook, for starters: you don’t know why an underground Cleveland band in 1975 would pick up this shard of World War II history, and you’re ready for a cool juxtaposition or non sequitur, whatever it is. 684 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Forward Progress: Suddenly, Tammy!, "Hard Lesson" (1995)

If you think “Hard Lesson” is a great album opener because it gets you charged up in a forward-moving way, if you’re amazed at how it pulls together all the lanes and overpasses when you play it on the freeway, then let’s talk: 382 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Half Steps: Jack Bruce, "The Consul At Sunset" (1971)

There’s good reason for differentiating sharply between “whole” and “half” steps in a musical scale: only whole steps feel like definite steps. Half steps feel iffy at best.[1]  The pentatonic scale, popular around the world, can be defined as the scale that wants nothing to do with half steps. 655 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Perfect Flailing: Sebadoh, "Hillbilly II" (1996)

Simon Smith, June 2015

Something paradoxical and tragic happened once we picked up guitars and started discharging our energy upon the world. We began in freedom and ended in chains. 447 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Getting Under My Skin: John Hiatt, "Something Happens" (1982)

John Hiatt’s All of a Sudden (1982) is a very good lost album that from our perspective doesn’t sound like the future of John Hiatt or of anything. 160 more words

Rock Aesthetics