Tags » Rock Aesthetics

Fluency: Robben Ford, "Talk To Your Daughter" (1988)

I’m breaking a cardinal rule for Hooks posts and writing one without any analytical idea about the track that calls forth my tribute. That’s the thing: that Robben Ford’s lead guitar licks in “Talk To My Daughter” are so deeply satisfying without having anything surprising or otherwise grabbing about them. 237 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Great Love, "My man": Laura Nyro, "Tom Cat Goodby" (1969)

What would it be like to hear real love in music? What would declare it adequately? Would there be a sound of ecstatic transport–soaring high notes, a fluttering up and down scales, Melisma City? 481 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Creepy Love #2, "So fine": Jefferson Airplane, "Watch Her Ride" (1967)

I knew with my last post I’d taken at least one too many swipes at love in song, and it was past time to go positive on this topic. 763 more words

Rock Aesthetics

The Creepiest Love Trope: The Philosopher Kings, "All To Myself" (1994)


This is not exactly a neglected topic, but you know how it is: you hear a song you really like and it starts you thinking again. 750 more words

Rock Aesthetics

Classic Unique: Fiona Apple, "Extraordinary Machine" (2005)

Our words wait quietly in the dictionary with their meanings ready, paws tucked under. When we take them out,  sometimes we try to make them sit still there, there, and there, like in info-speak; or let them run, like in poetry; or we jerk on their leashes orally for a momentary effect, like in every third or fourth moment in live conversation. 254 more words

Rock Aesthetics

The Thought of Wising Up: Aimee Mann, "Wise Up" (1996)

Claudia singing along with “Wise Up” in Magnolia

Aimee Mann’s “Wise Up” is a magnificent example of deep effects achieved by simple means.

At first the music seems to consist of nothing but a lovely G major 9th chord. 404 more words

Rock Aesthetics

The Greatest Point: Nilsson, "The Most Beautiful World In The World" (1972)


Even joke music means something, right? Because otherwise, why go to the trouble of striking a jokey attitude? You’re making some kind of run at what you’re joking about. 432 more words

Rock Aesthetics