Tags » Ruins Of Detroit

The Enchantment of Decay

There is something powerfully seductive in images of environmental decay. These locations––often sites of mass abandonment––can facilitate spectacular photographs, and typically the more sudden the exodus, the more interesting the photographic potential. 406 more words


By Sean O’Hagan in the Guardian:

‘Many times we would enter huge art deco buildings with once-beautiful chandeliers, ornate columns and extraordinary frescoes and everything was crumbling and covered in dust and the sense that you had entered a lost world was almost overwhelming.”

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Urban Life Decay

Each of these photo essays were captivating in their own way. The most striking of which, in my eyes, was The Ruins of Detroit. The image I’m choosing to analyze is that of the Fort Shelby Hotel. 406 more words

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The Ruins of Detroit (Ballroom, Lee Plaza Hotel) Analysis

I always think it’s easiest to include an image that your are analyzing, so you can constantly refer back to it. I took a screenshot of the image while on the “The Ruins of Detroit” website. 545 more words

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The Future is Black

I would like to add something to my blog that has been on my mind recently; the ruins of Detroit. The East Lansing Public Library recently hosted Professor Carl Taylor and his discussion of Detroit as a third city. 210 more words

General Motors and the Detroit City Council had a hell of a lot more to do with it than God

For the average photographer interested in photographing abandoned buildings, Detroit may seem like the mecca of urban ruins (1). On the other hand, John Patrick Leary’s article “Detroitism” looks at the suffering community that is being exploited through this sensationalist photography. 869 more words


marchand & meffre

French photographers Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre started capturing the decay of Detroit in 2005. They were fascinated by how the town’s economic suffering left it literally in ruins. 71 more words