Tags » Sarah Coakley

Sarah Coakley - The value of Théologie totale

We can therefore conclude that non-reductive sociology, and especially non-reductive sociology of religion, has a vital role to play as handmaid to a theologie totale. God ‘in the field’ is found by lifting the decks on the grimy ills of ‘Wigan Pier’ without getting stuck there, not by fantasizing about a postmodern theme park ‘Wigan Pier’ of unreal nostalgia (for a lost past of neo-Gothic liturgical enchantment), nor by denying that the sea of faith is often awash with muck. 80 more words

Desire

Sarah Coakley - A Théologie totale is engaged with the social sciences but should not be controlled by them

Hence a théologie totale refuses to reduce doctrine to a mere effect of social, political, or patriarchal conditions. For once such a reductive hermeneutics of suspicion is allowed to triumph over the (eternal, divine) invitation to charity, forgiveness, and reconciliation, a new idolatry has also triumphed: that of anger stuck in victimology, and the implicit recreation of a ‘God’ made merely in my own image.  8 more words

Desire

Sarah Coakley - God, Sexuality and the Self

My next book will be the excellent book by Sarah Coakley, God, Sexuality, and the Self – An Essay ‘On the Trinity’ (2013). In it she gives an compelling systematical theological account of the trinity and shows that sexual desire is comparable to the desire for God. 45 more words

Desire

Contemplating the Trinity. A Review of Sarah Coakley's "God, Sexuality, and the Self."

Sarah Coakley, God, Sexuality, and the Self, Cambridge University Press, 2013, xxi + 365 pp., $29.99 (paperback). Link to purchase here.

“In God, ‘desire’ of course signifies no lack – as it manifestly does in humans.

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Reviews

A Third-Wave of Trinitarian Theology? Sarah Coakley's Recent Typology

In her recent article, “Afterword: Relational Ontology, Trinity, and Science,” in the volume The Trinity and an Entangled World ed. by John Polkinghorn, Sarah Coakley enumerates what she calls three general “waves” of Trinitarian theology in the twentieth century.   1,907 more words

Theology

I'm back

Well, it’s been a while – and in truth a long road – but I’m back to blog at reddresstheology!

My PhD thesis has been submitted (cue: crowd roar) and I have spare headspace for the first time in 18 months or so. 497 more words

Theology

The Green Report

For the past week or so, we Anglicans on social media have been roistering about the report of a working party chaired by The Rev’d Prebendary the Lord Green… 1,237 more words

Theology