Tags » Scholarship Roundup

Florensky, "Early Religious Writings" (Jakim, trans.)

As readers of this blog know, the Center co-sponsored a conference last week at the Fondazione Bruno Kessler in Trent, Italy on tradition in American and Russian thought. 233 more words

Scholarship Roundup

Tonnelat & Kornblum, "International Express"

One reason it’s so appropriate to have a center for law and religion here at St. John’s is that our main campus sits in perhaps the most religiously diverse county in the nation–the Borough of Queens in New York City. 444 more words

Scholarship Roundup

Cutterham, "Gentlemen Revolutionaries"

Here is an interesting looking new book from Princeton on the Framers’ generation, Gentlemen Revolutionaries: Power and Justice in the New American Republic, by historian Tom Cutterham (University of Birmingham). 272 more words

Scholarship Roundup

Writeup of Last Week's Event in Trent

The Fondazione Bruno Kessler has posted this report of our conference on tradition and traditionalism in American and Russian thought. The conference, at the Fondazione’s headquarters in Trent, Italy, was a very worthwhile event. 195 more words

Scholarship Roundup

Waldron, "One Another's Equals"

Arguably, the most important value in human rights law in the West today is equality. (Dignity is a close contender). Equality, however, is a comparative concept; one must first decide whether things are like one another before one can decide whether they must receive equal treatment. 315 more words

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Lawrence, "The Koran in English"

For English-language scholars trying to learn about Islamic law, the lack of authoritative sources in English can be a real problem. Most Islamic scholarship is in languages that are inaccessible to Americans; one has no choice but to rely on translations, which may or may not be reliable. 352 more words

Scholarship Roundup

Wilkinson, "All Falling Faiths"

The Sixties won the Culture Wars. Or, perhaps it’s better to say, the Sixties are winning; Culture Wars never really end. That Sixties culture dominates America today is obvious, and many celebrate that fact. 276 more words

Scholarship Roundup