Tags » Science Reporting

Talking Headlines: with Professor Jim Coyne

James Coyne is Emeritus Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also Director of Behavioral Oncology at the Abramson Cancer Centre and Senior Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. 1,265 more words

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SEMINAR REFLECTION - SCIENCE AND JOURNALISM

We discussed science and journalism in this week’s seminar. It was interesting as it could be linked to social media and the ‘verification process’ it requires. 290 more words

Seminar Term 2

The God Particle Discovered? Maybe not.

I haven’t finished writing my post on experimental design, but a discussion I’m engaged in elsewhere reminded me of a particularly dramatic example of the divide between scientific reporting and actual scientific research. 316 more words

NPR Station Gushes Over 'Psychic Detectives' and 'Forensic Astrologer'

Your Radio Has Let You Down

You turn on your radio, and are surprised to hear a talkshow host gushing “Oh wow!” over “psychic detectives” and “forensic astrologers.”  Did you accidentally tune in to the home of the fringe, “Coast to Coast?”  You check the dial.  2,914 more words

Skepticism

Our first blog assignment: Here is an example

Start by writing a headline that captures your point in a few words. Capitalize first letter of first word — not every word. Also use cap after a colon and for proper nouns.  438 more words

Analysis

Talking Headlines: Professor Dorothy Bishop on Science in the Media

Welcome to a new series of posts, Talking Headlines, where we interview world-leading researchers and journalists about their experiences and views on how the media portrays research. 1,539 more words

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Lies, damned lies and statistics (about press releases)

According to the famous saying, there are three types of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics. Earlier this month, we had some of the latter, though interestingly the statistics concerned the extent to which researchers exaggerate their findings in press releases, and how that exaggeration filters through to media reports. 817 more words

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