Tags » Screwball Comedy

Review: The Miracle of Morgan's Creek (1944)


Image from filmforum.org

The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek is a 1944 screwball comedy written and directed by Preston Sturges, of The Lady Eve and Sullivan’s Travels fame. 477 more words

Review

Easy Living (1937)

Easy Living, 1937, Paramount Pictures. Starring Jean Arthur, Edward Arnold, Ray Milland. Directed by Mitchell Leisen. B&W, 89 minutes.

A series of misunderstandings almost lead to a stock crash that could rival that of October 29, 1929, and all because J. 383 more words

Classic Films

Much Ado About Nothing (1993)

100 Films’ 100 Favourites #64

A romantic comedy for anyone
who’s ever been in love.

Country: UK & USA
Language: English
Runtime: 111 minutes
BBFC: 865 more words

Adaptations

It’s a Wonderful World (1939)

It’s a Wonderful Life…I Mean World

The first 10 minutes of It’s a Wonderful World is just rather dull set up for an incomprehensible murder mystery, but when Stewart becomes a fugitive on the run trying to prove his innocence and Claudette Colbert enters the picture, it’s all smooth sailing even with the largely impossible to understand plot. 268 more words

Movie Reviews

You Can’t Take It with You (1938)

It’s August, which means it’s time for another theme month.  This time, I’m going to look at mental health through the decades.  I work in the mental health field – tangentially, at least – so I feel like I know just enough to make random declarations about the subject, though not necessarily enough to discuss real issues. 724 more words

Best Pictures

It Happened One Night (1934)

Without knowing anything about the film except its title, I probably would have placed this in the genre of those 50’s science fiction-y flicks with the Claymation monsters.  613 more words

Best Pictures

Favourite screwball comedy movies

Launched in the mid-1930s, screwball comedies were characterized by “satire of American society, romantic conflicts , battles of the sexes, sight gags, sarcasm, plot twists, verbal duels and witty dialogues”. 794 more words

Cinema