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A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 44: ‘If the dull substance of my flesh were thought’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 44th sonnet

‘If the dull substance of my flesh were thought, / Injurious distance should not stop my way’: yes, sonnet 44 in Shakespeare’s Sonnets is another poem about the long-distance love… 594 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 43: ‘When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 43rd sonnet

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 43 opens with an apparent paradox: ‘When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see’. How can you see most clearly when your eyes are, in fact, closed? 580 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 42: ‘That thou hast her it is not all my grief’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 42nd sonnet

William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 42 doesn’t exactly provide the answer to the question of life, the universe and everything – nor is it the finest sonnet in Shakespeare’s Sonnets. 542 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 41: ‘Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 41st sonnet

As opening lines go, ‘Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits’ is not up there with some of the opening lines that we’ve had earlier on in Shakespeare’s Sonnets, such as the rightly celebrated opening lines to… 592 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 38: ‘How can my Muse want subject to invent’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 38th sonnet

We continue our exploration and analysis of Shakespeare’s sonnets this week with, predictably enough after Sonnet 37 last week, Sonnet 38. 653 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 37: ‘As a decrepit father takes delight’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 37th sonnet

Sonnet 37 is not a classic Shakespeare sonnet. But it does contain some interesting aspects which careful analysis can help us to elucidate. 635 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 36: ‘Let me confess that we two must be twain’

A summary of Shakespeare’s 36th sonnet

‘Let me confess that we two must be twain.’ Things are beginning to fall apart here, and the honeymoon period between Shakespeare and the Fair Youth gives way to Sonnet 36, the first of what are sometimes called the ‘separation sonnets’. 683 more words

Literature