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A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 35: ‘No more be grieved at that which thou hast done’

A reading of Shakespeare’s sonnet

Sonnet 35 develops a theme, or strand, within the Sonnets which Shakespeare had begun in Sonnet 33, and then elaborated on in the previous sonnet. 620 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 34: ‘Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day’

A reading of a Shakespeare sonnet

Shakespeare’s Sonnet 34 continues the marvellous heights of Sonnet 33, and is similarly worthy of close analysis and discussion, not least because this sonnet, beginning ‘Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day…?’, continues the sun/cloud imagery introduced in the previous sonnet. 653 more words

Literature

Time & Timelessness

Thoughts central to Shakespeare’s sonnets are beauty, procreation, nature and time. Personal beauty overcomes the ravages of time by procreation, “Die single and thy image dies with thee.”(sonnet 3) “For never-resting time leads summer on/To hideous winter and confounds him there;”(Sonnet 5) 45 more words

Culture

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 33: ‘Full many a glorious morning have I seen’

A reading of a classic Shakespeare sonnet

‘Full many a glorious morning have I seen’: Sonnet 33 is, without doubt, one of the more famous of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. 627 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 32: ‘If thou survive my well-contented day’

A reading of a Shakespeare sonnet

Sonnet 32 sees Shakespeare musing upon his own death. What if he were to die, and later poets come along with better poems for the Fair Youth? 486 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 31: ‘Thy bosom is endeared with all hearts’

A reading of Shakespeare’s 31st sonnet

After the two preceding sonnets, Sonnet 31 seems like a bit of a comedown and, indeed, a let-down; yet it’s worthy of analysis because of its treatment of the idea of a love ‘dead’ and ‘buried’. 442 more words

Literature

A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 30: ‘When to the sessions of sweet silent thought’

A reading of Shakespeare’s 30th sonnet

‘When to the sessions of sweet silent thought / I summon up remembrance of things past’: these rank among the more famous lines from Shakespeare’s Sonnets. 663 more words

Literature