Tags » Shelley

Frankenstein: It's Complicated

Even if you have never read Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, you know the name. The image of the monster (perhaps of the scene when it comes to life, lightning crashing, the mad scientist screaming, “It’s alive!”). 1,000 more words

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Small and sophisticated: Wileman demitasse cups from 1889

These little demitasse cups are as sophisticated as they are small. Demitasse cups became very popular in the second half of the 19th Century, when the better-off classes would have a strong black coffee after supper. 37 more words

Porcelain

You are a star! Wileman teacup trio from 1890

This teacup trio, made by Wileman in 1890, is the star of them all. A beautiful transfer pattern in warm red on white porcelain. Transfer is a technique where a pattern is etched into a metal plate, then inked over, and the ink pattern is transferred to the raw or “biscuit” china by paper. 10 more words

Porcelain

Apropos of the odd controversy about Shelley's nose

Sir Percy and Lady Shelley, RLS’s neighbours at Bournemouth, had attached themselves warmly to RLS, and saw in his ways and character a living image of those of the poet, Sir Percy’s father, as they imagined him.

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Robert Louis Stevenson

Flow blue ferns from Wileman - 1895

This gorgeous cup trio was made with the “flow blue” technique, an ancient Chinese technique that came to England with the first Chinese exports in the 17th Century. 23 more words

Porcelain

Shamrocks on a snowdrop - Wileman 1898

The snowdrop cup is perhaps the most beautiful of all Wileman models, with its richly flowing saucer stack. This is even better than usual as there is a cake plate added! 18 more words

Porcelain

Shelley Sunday Monday: Letter from Shelley to Mary Regarding Rumours

From Oxford’s Shelley Ghost:

In August 1821 Shelley travelled to Ravenna to see Byron, who wished to speak to him urgently about Allegra. While in Ravenna Shelley learned that Byron’s friends the Hoppners had been told a ‘monstrous & incredible’ story by the Shelleys’ former servant Elise. 568 more words