Tags » Short Stories & Novellas

Suspended Sentences, by Patrick Modiano, translated by Mark Polizzotti

Suspended Sentences is a trio of linked novellas by Nobel Prize winner Patrick Modiano, translated by Mark Polizzetti and published by Yale University Press late in 2014.   1,106 more words

Reviews

The House in Smyrna, by Tatiana Salem Levy, translated by Alison Entrekin

It took me a little while to come to grips with the voice of the narrator of The House in Smyrna – it’s only fair to let you know from the outset that this novella of only 155 pages takes a bit of re-reading in order to make sense of it.  625 more words

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The Haunted Hotel, by Wilkie Collins

Sometimes, a daft melodrama from the 19th century is a good break from serious reading.  The Haunted Hotel by Wilkie Collins fits the bill.  It was apparently a contribution to the weekly periodical All the Year Round in 1859, one of five short stories bookended by stories from Charles Dickens for a Christmas edition.   735 more words

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Navigatio, by Patrick Holland

Navigatio is an enchanting book.   Derived from an ancient text called the Navigatio, Patrick Holland’s novella is a retelling of the legendary voyage of St Brendan of Clonfert, and it follows the form of the Irish immram: 539 more words

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Springtime, by Michelle de Kretser

I liked this playful little book.  Mildly provocatively, it plays up the Melbourne-Sydney rivalry, and it subverts its own genre.  It’s cunningly constructed so that the reader finds herself bemused and amused. 463 more words

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Every Day is for the Thief, by Teju Cole

Every Day is for the Thief is a curious book: the blurb says that it’s a novel but it reads nothing like a novel, more like a travel memoir, and a rather melancholy memoir at that. 415 more words

21st Century

A Thousand Peaceful Cities, by Jerzy Pilch, translated by David Frick

A Thousand Peaceful Cities is a textbook example of how the internet has changed my reading habits.  Ten years ago when all my reading was filtered by what was available in bricks-and-mortar bookshops, I would never have heard of the Polish author Jerzy Pilch, much less read his amusing little book or be sharing my enjoyment of it on a blog.  888 more words

21st Century