Tags » Slaughterhouse-Five

American Literature Month: (One From the Archive) 'Slaughterhouse Five' by Kurt Vonnegut ****

First published September 2013.

I feel, after finishing Slaughterhouse Five, that I should have started reading Vonnegut’s work a long while ago.  For me, the premise of this novel is a wonderful one, and its standing within the canon of American literature made it seem like a good book of Vonnegut’s to begin with.  244 more words

Book Review - Akadamie X : Lessons in Art + Life

Picked up this book as something to read on the plane back home from Hong Kong. I love Phaidon as a publisher – they continue to get new arty and design focus books onto the shelves of the ever diminishing range of bookshops around the world. 1,828 more words

2. Gear

Thoughts?

What are some questions that you have about this particular novel?  What have you noticed that is interesting or concerning?

Siddhartha

Review: Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Prisoner of war, optometrist, time-traveller – these are the life roles of Billy Pilgrim, hero of this miraculously moving, bitter and funny story of innocence faced with apocalypse. 530 more words

Book Review

Memorial Day in the Backwards Universe

Billy looked at the clock on the gas stove. He had an hour to kill before the saucer came. He went into the living room, swinging the bottle like a dinner bell, turned on the television. 354 more words

Look At What I Found On The Internet

The Candles and the Soap: On Vonnegut, Death, and Repetition

Placed after a mention of death or dying, Kurt Vonnegut’s “So it goes” refrain throughout Slaughterhouse Five utilizes repetition to explore the inevitability of death. Early on in the book, Billy Pilgrim writes a letter to a newspaper about his experiences with extra terrestrials, and explains the origin of the phrase: 173 more words

Writing

Running Out of Time snow globe

Running out of time … what if it weren’t that time were running out? What if you were running?
This globe reminded me of the powerful thoughts in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five. 93 more words