Tags » Summorum Pontificum

Maxima Quidem

Introductory Note

Blessed Pope Pius IX is imagined by many as a bitter reactionary and megalomaniac, the Pope who locked himself up in the Vatican and shut out the modern world, who arranged his own apotheosis and announced “ 3,408 more words

Translations

S. Armaticus reblogged this on The Deus Ex Machina Blog and commented:

FOR THE RECORD Pius IXThe below is a re-blog from The Josias Blog. I have also linked to this blog in the right hand margin for your convenience. For further reference to information on Pius IX, a link to the Pope Pius IX website can be found here. Blessed Pope Pius IX, ora pro nobis.

Fr Picot - Conference on Summorum Pontificum - 11 March 2015

An excellent conference given in Wanganui, NZ on the so-called “traditional” motu proprio of Pope Benedict XVI.

“To summarize Summorum Pontificum, any priest can say the Mass provided he is incardinated, provided he recognises the value and holiness of the New Mass, provided he recognises the binding character of  Second Council Vatican.” 161 more words

Archbishop Lefebvre

Rumor Has It

Rumor has it that the ecclesiastical authority for this diocese has mandated a “revision of liturgical music more in keeping with the tradition of the Church and in line with the dictates set forth in Sacroscanctum Concilium, the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, promulgated by Vatican II”.  316 more words

New Camera Angles For Papal General Audiences?

I went to RomeReports yesterday to watch Pope Francis’ Wednesday General Audience.  The video is nearly an hour.  It begins as usual with the pope circulating through the gathered crowd, stopping periodically to kiss a child held up to him, trying on skull caps handed to him, waving and I assume blessing people. 406 more words

Pope Francis The Muddle-Headed?

S. Armaticus reblogged this on The Deus Ex Machina Blog and commented:

FOR THE RECORD. Ed. Note: This blog has tracked attendance information pertaining to numbers of people coming to see Francis, whether they were pedestrians during his Strasbourg visit (see here and here) or pilgrims attending the General Audiences and coming out for feast days in St. Peter's Square (see here). To this information, I need to add this post from the excellent blog EX MAGNA SILENTIUM or EX MAGNO SILENTIO FOR THE RECORD. (see here) What I find even more interesting is a comment submitted by stevephoenix72. I will reproduce it here at the top of this re-blog and WITHOUT COMMENT:

stevephoenix72 says: April 24, 2015 at 2:22 pm

I had not had the occasion to share this fact with you and your readers, Steve e.: but, recently, a “New Church” (my phraseology) religious sister returned from a visit to Rome at Easter: she and her congregation are very pro-Bergoglio, and she commented that she had attended one of the Easter papal general audiences.

She also commented how sad it was that people seemed not to be supporting Pope Francis: she added that she and others who went to attend the audience on her particular day were actually paid, I repeat, paid, to attend the audience. I was so astounded that I didn’t think quickly enough at the time to ask how many Euros–just as well, because I didn’t want to seem too interested. I said it was indeed sad to hear.

Now, those who know Rome also know that very often, esp. under P. John Paul II and P. Benedict XVI that tickets were needed in advance for certain occasions—but they were free, and obtained either from one of the religious orders or congregations, if you knew whom to ask, or usually from the Vatican office at the Port of the Clock. No one, ever, received payment for attending!

So, even the Bergoglio-istas are aware of the lens image of unpopularity.

It is really bad.

If this is true...

The very best company

See the full article here: http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2015/04/major-interview-with-abbot-of.html

Wise words from a man of prayer!

Of course one cannot copy former times absolutely, but one should try to recover precious treasures, one of which is the Liturgy, with its clear Godward direction, which is so important in the contemplative life!

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Catholicism