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4.3

My tongue will tell the
anger of my heart, or
else my heart
concealing it will break.

– William Shakespeare, Taming of the Shrew

Anisahhamid.com

Ostentation and Identity in the Taming of the Shrew (part 3)

In her article “Patriarchy and Play in The Taming of the Shrew,” Marianne L. Novy of the University of Pittsburgh points out the connection between the induction and the first scene of the play-within-a-play. 1,200 more words

William Shakespeare

Ostentation and Identity in the Taming of the Shrew (part 2)

While The Taming of the Shrew purports to be a play about relationships between men and women, and also features a crossdressing character, the display of gender identity merely serves to set the stage for a closer look at the way in which wealth and status, like gender, are displayed through ostentation. 2,102 more words

William Shakespeare

Ostentation and Identity in the Taming of the Shrew (part 1)

As a keen observer of and commentator upon psychology and human behavior, Shakespeare, naturally, also delved frequently into social criticism. Much of Shakespeare’s social criticism finds its focus in the rapidly changing class structures of Elizabethan England and the ways the members of those classes derived and displayed self-definition through membership in their respective classes. 1,504 more words

William Shakespeare

The Taming of the Shrew as Biblical Commentary (part 7)

Various interpreters and commentators have offered a diversity of opinions on the final scene of the play. David Bevington, a Shakespeare scholar the University of Chicago, describes the great variety of recent stage renditions of Katherine’s final monologue in his introduction to… 189 more words

Bible

Katherine and Disguise

In The Taming of the Shrew, there are plenty of examples of characters that disguise themselves as someone they’re not in order to defy their social class and accomplish their goals. 798 more words

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespearean Acceptance of Buying Love

The treatment of women back in Shakespearean time can be seen as repulsive to the modern reader. The women are portrayed as simply being property, in which suitors have the right to their love. 384 more words

A Midsummer Night's Dream