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Dirty Boots: "When the Underground Is Just Not Anymore"

The one chance I had to see a show at Masquerade, back in the heyday, was when a group of friends and I went over to Atlanta in the summer of 1992 for the second Lollapalooza tour. 600 more words

The Deep South

#throwbackthursday: Prince's "When Doves Cry," 1984

When I was young, the music of the ’80s seemed kind of weak compared to the music of the ’60s and ’70s, which had brought us Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, and The Doors. 137 more words

The Deep South

Southern Movie 39: "The Dynamiter" (2011)

Though it came out in 2011, eight years ago, I had never heard of The Dynamiter until I came across it in Amazon Prime, where its icon in that never-ending scroll of film choices was littered with award laurels. 3,625 more words

The Deep South

Lazy Afternoon Reruns: "Thinking One Way, Voting Another"

The Spring 2017 Alabama Public Opinion Survey, conducted by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama (PARCA), shows some disturbing conclusions about the political ideas in my home state. 178 more words

Alabama

Dirty Boots: "Reflecting on the National Sustainability Teachers' Academy"

Two weeks ago, I attended Arizona State University’s week-long National Sustainability Teachers’ Academy, which was held on the campus of the University of Montana in Missoula, and while the overt lessons presented during the professional-development workshop were about sustainability – obviously – peripheral discussions among the participants also caught my attention. 872 more words

Alabama

Lazy Afternoon Reruns: "My Source for Some Definitive"

In the “People” section of the April 26, 1989 issue of the Atlanta Constitution newspaper, the headline read, “It’s Full Speed Ahead for Local Indigo Girls.” The article below explained that the folk-rock duo of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers was on tour with REM, had an album that had gone gold, was about to appear on the… 196 more words

The Deep South

Dirty Boots: "Our Last-ness"

In Alabama, thinkers from all points on the political spectrum seem to enjoy raising the issue of our last-ness. Whether the tone toward the facts is deep consternation, an indifferent shrug, or something in-between, the tendency to comment on or allude to our position at the bottom spans the boundaries of race, gender, class, and political affiliation. 775 more words

Alabama