Tags » The Great Courses

Reason and Faith: Philosophy in the Middle Ages (A Review)

Summing up two dozen or so lectures can be a hard thing to do. But, not this time around; Thomas Williams’s Great Courses Series Reason and Faith: Philosophy in the Middle Ages… 761 more words

Undergraduate Posts

The 14th Century and Beyond (Notes:80)

A general feature of histories of medieval philosophy is that they abruptly stop around or after the 14th century. Other histories highly praise Aquinas, raising him to a height synonymous with the ending of medieval philosophy, while deriding Occam’s skepticism. 611 more words

Undergraduate Posts

Occam on the Prospects for Knowing God (Notes:79)

Unlike many of his contemporaries, Occam was not very optimistic about the possibility of knowing God. Occam goes as far as to reject the idea that Christian philosophy aspires to the same intellectual standards as pagan philosophy, going as far to argue that the best we can hope for is a peaceful separation. 1,287 more words

Undergraduate Posts

What Occam's Razor Leaves Behind (Notes:78)

Occam’s contribution to medieval philosophy is located within logic and metaphysics, not necessarily ‘reason and faith’. But, he does have his importance to this project. Top among these principles is the idea that has since come to be known as “Occam’s Razor”. 1,713 more words

Undergraduate Posts

Scotus on Saying Exactly what God Is (Notes:77)

Aristotle’s theory of knowledge. Scotus and Aquinas did not disagree on everything and here, among others, is one of the best places to understand; namely, that our natural knowledge of God begins with our experience of sensible things. 1,871 more words

Undergraduate Posts

Scotus on God's Freedom and Ours (Notes:76)

Modern students of medieval philosophy usually see Aquinas’s reconciliation of Aristotelian and Christian doctrine as the high point of medieval philosophy. However, to many of Aquinas’s contemporaries, the idea of making good Aristotle seemed dangerous. 1,676 more words

Undergraduate Posts

Aquinas on Natural and Supernatural Virtues (Notes:75)

Aquinas believed that in addition to the natural order which philosophy investigates, there was a supernatural order which did not supersede the natural but was simply beyond the competency of philosophy to understand. 1,837 more words

Undergraduate Posts