Tags » The North

Henry Wilson Arms Himself

Preston Brooks could have challenged Charles Sumner to a duel. The Yankee would have refused and his fellow Northerners would have dismissed Brooks as a barbarian, but Brooks had the option. 514 more words

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Back to Washington with Senators Wilson and Butler

The Public Indignation Meeting at Faneuil Hall on May 30 featured diverse Massachusetts luminaries¬†venting their displeasure¬†at Sumner’s treatment. Some of the same politicians made their displeasure known in a more formal setting. 553 more words

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To "record our protest against such a doing"

George Hillard, who has known Charles Sumner for years and once considered him a friend as well as a law partner, condemned Preston Brooks’ caning of his old friend as inhuman and brutal. 377 more words

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"Not first that it was inhuman and brutal, but it was cowardly"

Massachusetts’ Know-Nothing governor, Henry Gardner, had mixed feelings about Sumner’s caning. He condemned it at the public indignation meeting, but left room in his condemnation for anyone who harbored doubts about whether Sumner had gone too far. 611 more words

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Governor Gardner on Sumner's Caning

New Yorkers across the political spectrum, from the conservative establishment of the North’s most proslavery city to reformers and radicals, united in condemning Charles Sumner’s caning by Preston Brooks… 638 more words

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"We respectfully await the action of the House of Representatives"

New York City’s public indignation meeting got off to a bit of a slow start, despite the packed Tabernacle. The crowd arrived on time, but not the committee and speakers. 502 more words

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To "firmly and boldly oppose and overthrow any and every set scheme"

New Yorkers did not think highly of Preston Brooks’ violent escapade against Charles Sumner’s skull on the floor of the United States Senate. By breaking a cane over Sumner’s head, the South Carolinian… 571 more words

Road To War