Tags » Theologia Crucis

The Cross of Reality: A Personal Review

Gaylon Barker’s book about the theology of the cross in Bonhoeffer “The Cross of Reality: Luther’s Theologia Crucis and Bonhoeffer’s Christology” deserves the highest praise. Although, I have to admit, it’s also been a pain in the ass until I read it. 829 more words

English

"Christopraxis" - A Review

As a theologian researching the theology of the cross (theologia crucis) in Bonhoeffer, it was time for me to read Andy Root’s “Christopraxis, A Practical Theology of the Cross.” I’m not a practical theologian. 1,321 more words

English

Fleming Rutledge- The Crucifixion

Fleming Rutledge and Justification

Fleming Rutledge – The Crucifixion: Understanding the Death of Jesus Christ. Eerdmans, 2015.

This is a good time for the church – there are many women doing great work in theology at the moment. 1,324 more words

Book Review

Bonhoeffer's Theology of the Cross

Bonhoeffer’s theology is a modern version of Luther’s theology of the cross. It is not merely a slavishly reworked version but constitutes a highly original contribution to the conversation that captures both the essential elements and the heart of Luther’s theology and makes it relevant for today. 571 more words

English

THEOLOGIA RESURRECTIS, concl.

Alister McGrath continues his glowing epitome of Luther’s thought: “Whereas worldly wisdom deals with visible things—and hence can call upon the evidence of sense-perception in support of its conclusions—faith is denied this possibility” (p. 751 more words

The Atonement

THEOLOGIA RESURRECTIS, part 4

Luther taught that human wisdom takes offense at the Cross.  Very well, yet was the Resurrection not wise, or at least was it not perfectly designed to neutralize such offense? 1,405 more words

The Atonement

THEOLOGIA RESURRECTIS, part 3

Luther passed his new baton to his celebrated colleague at Wittenberg, Philip Melanthchon, who ran with it to the finish line: “forensic” justification.  This, as we can now see in retrospect, was simply code for “penal,” thus effectively stripping justice of its integral bi-polarity and one-sidedly reducing any saving virtue to an exclusively punitive necessity. 880 more words

The Atonement